Bait

Baits for trolling

All over the world, trolling — towing a baited line behind a moving boat – is a natural and obvious way of catching predatory fish. The problem with this in Britain, though, is that most of our sea fish species are confirmed bottom feeders. The exceptions are porbeagle shark, bass, pollack, mackerel and garfish. These …

Baits for trolling Read More »

Bait digging essentials

Digging your own lug or rag or collecting sandeels, cockles or crabs isn’t the most glamorous way of spending an afternoon. But there are many advantages in doing so. Fresh black lug, for example, is unsurpassed in tempting winter codling, and if you dig your own you can save a great deal of money. The …

Bait digging essentials Read More »

Digging and using rockworm

A member of the ragworm family, but rather rarer, the rockworm is found only in chalk rock, living in small sand-lined burrows and crevices. Similar to the king rag, but much smaller at about 8cm long, it is a bright brown/orange colour. It looks much like its close relative the small ragworm found inside the …

Digging and using rockworm Read More »

All about harbour rag

Very few big fish give harbour rag a second look. These small but juicy squirming worms are primarily a bait for hard shore venues where small fish are the target. High on the list of takers are flounders and thin-lipped mullet, but they also attract small pollack, wrasse, garfish, scad, pouting and herring. The only …

All about harbour rag Read More »

Scoring with sandeels

Four distinct species of large sandeel live in British waters – the greater, the smooth, Raitt’s and Corbin’s. These can be anything from 23 to 33cm long. Few anglers can distinguish between species so, in practice, all large sandeels are regarded as greater sandeels. They play a vital role in the marine food chain. Essentially …

Scoring with sandeels Read More »